Remedial massage

Remedial massage (aka clinical massage) works with whatever problem or problems you are suffering. This could be lower back pain, limited movement in the shoulder, difficulty sleeping or headaches.

We look at the whole picture, listening to what you tell us and using what we feel to inform our direction. We work with you to create a massage that best suits your needs.

We’ll use direct massage techniques where we find muscular related problems and more soothing and nurturing techniques as required. Where a site is too painful to work directly we can use other strategies.

Remedial massage can also be used to investigate problems and help you decide on any further treatment. Discussing problems during the treatment can be helpful. Attitudes to health and well-being and your relationship with your body can be useful topics of conversation. Where we offer advice it will be constructive and realistic.

Our approach to remedial massage

Our massage is not painful. We believe that pain is part of the cycle of tight muscles. We want to create movement and flexibility without triggering a counter-productive pain response.

Our approach is flexible, informal and open.

  • Understanding. It’s important to find out what’s happening.
  • Effective massage.
  • Recommendations. We can help you understand your symptoms and suggest the next steps.

If you need more advice, please make use of our free 10 minute phone consultation. Call 07941 094318.


Call now 07941 094318

Preparing for a performance event
Clinic locations
Prices & booking

I didn’t expect it to hurt there

Following lines of tension finds the areas that really need massage.

It’s quite common for people to feel pain at a specific point, but following investigation we often find that the painful spot is part of a wider band of tension. A typical example is lower back pain which can result in sharp, painful twinges often triggered by a particular movement. There’s probably tension down into the hips and up into the back.

In this case I explain that I’ll work at the point where the pain occurs, but also explore a wider area. What I want to do is uncover the whole chain of tension and work along that chain so that the whole problem is reduced. I’m using my sense of touch to check the condition of the tissues – muscles and tendons – and locate the tension. Healthy muscle is soft and flexible. Muscles which feel tough aren’t able to release properly. The associated tendons, which connect the muscle to bone, feel like taught ropes.

Once I massage into these areas clients can be surprised that they are tender, but welcome the relief. It’s taking the pressure off the painful area.

The pain is often due to muscle damage so I will work carefully in that area. Pain causes more tension and that’s counter productive. People know what feels right for them so I just ask.

Once the treatment is over the pain should be eased and the client feels more relaxed. We also have a better understanding of how their body is behaving. We might talk about possible causes and explore possible solutions such as stretches or movements they can do themselves or changes they can make to their environment or activity patterns to help.

One massage can often be a turning point and indicate the next step towards recovery.

Recovery and injury from the Bath Half

It’s normal to feel achy and stiff after a hard run – especially if you’ve pushed yourself to the limit.

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) usually comes on the following day and will be familiar to anyone who has ever pushed themselves physically. A day or two later you should feel fine. In the mean time, look after yourself with good food and plenty of fluids.

If beyond that you’re noticing your muscles feeling tight then a massage can help. At this stage massage can help lengthen shortened muscles and break up any of the congestion which makes muscles feel hard.

If you’re suffering other problems such as back, hip, neck or shoulder pain, massage can help too.

Muscle Injury (Sprain)

If you have pain, redness, swelling and heat which came on immediately these are the symptoms of a muscle injury. You should immediately:

Rest the affected part
Apply ice to cool the area (not directly on the skin)
Bandage the area to help limit swelling and
Elevate the limb

Seek medical advice if you are unsure.

When these symptoms have gone you can gently return to stretching and exercise, being careful not to cause more damage to the weakened area.

As scar tissue forms, use massage to help it’s fibres line up with the muscle fibres. Scar tissue is not as strong or flexible as the original muscle.